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The Birth of Thalyria


First, there was Chaos. Gaia emerged from the whirling mass without form. Her son Uranus forged the first worlds, giving shape to land and life to plants and animals. Together, Gaia and Uranus birthed three-headed Giants, the one-eyed Cyclopes, and the Titans, six sons and six daughters who ruled as Gods.

But Gaia could not forget, or forgive, Uranus's harsh treatment of her firstborn children, for he had callously cast those deformed creatures into the Underworld. And so she persuaded her Titan offspring to seek revenge upon their father.

Cronus, the youngest of the twelve, led the attack. But as Uranus took his final breaths, he foretold Cronus's own death at the hands of his future son. Fearing his predicted downfall, Cronus snatched each of his newborn children in turn from the loving arms of his wife, Rhea, and heartlessly swallowed them whole.

Devastated, Rhea took great pains to hide and protect her sixth child, Zeus. Safe from his father, Zeus grew into manhood with vengeance on his mind. Determined to rescue his siblings, he tricked his father into drinking a potion that made Cronus violently ill, and Hades, Poseidon, Demeter, Hera, and Hestia tumbled from the Titan's mouth, completely unharmed.

Reunited at last, the new Gods sought revenge. The war was long, bitter, and seemingly without end. In a bid to turn the tides, Zeus asked the Cyclopes for help, releasing them from the Underworld in exchange for three gifts. They gave the mighty thunderbolt to Zeus, the invisibility helmet to Hades, and the trident to Poseidon. Thus armed, the brothers killed their father and vanquished the Titans, banishing all but two of their ancestors to a realm of eternal punishment. Cronus, perhaps undeservingly, went to a glorious afterlife in the Elysian Fields, while Atlas, his war leader, was cursed to hold up the enormous weight of the heavens forevermore.

Freed from conflict, Zeus settled his court on the high and universal peak of Mount Olympus and turned his attention to his next task, creating mankind. Soon after, Zeus discovered that a Titan princess had borne him a healthy son. He took the boy, and as a gift to his firstborn child, he formed a new world for him. Eternally marked by his father's betrayal and a lifetime of war, Zeus intended his son's new home to be a kingdom of peace and unity. With infinite care, he carved the land with the most powerful of magic, populated it in his own image, and named it Thalyria.